Course Roadmap

Entrepreneurship@Rice has an ever-increasing set of courses and co-curricular activities. To make things easier, we’ve prepared this handy roadmap of courses offered by the Entrepreneurship Initiative.

Undergraduate
Getting Started? Explore the Basics.
In this course, students will learn and experience a process for innovation-based venture development. During the semester, students will form teams and create a plan for a new venture. Credit may not be received for both BUSI 462 and BUSI 221.
The course teaches how to translate a startup business plan into a bottoms up quantitative model of the business and its underlying assumptions. Students will learn how to build a model of cash flows for a startup, how to use that model to track performance and identify errors in the underlying assumptions and adjust, and how to update the model based on realized performance.
This class meets select Wednesdays from 4-5 PM followed by small group discussion. The class explores changes in the economy and information technology that give rise to questions about the future of ideas, work and careers, identity and relationships, and solutions and problems. Repeatable for Credit.For additional information, see freestylerice.org.

Want to explore questions about technology innovation, from generative code, to social bots, to high-tech accelerators? Are you an innovator with an interest in understanding the intersection of social science, computer science, and design? Come join future idea leaders of high-tech firms, designers, and policymakers to explore cutting-edge frontiers. Students will work on independent projects to iterate solutions across multiple fields.

Take it to the Next Level.

What does it mean to solve a social problem with entrepreneurship? Who are civic innovators? This course introduces students to contemporary concepts necessary for analyzing and engaging in the sphere of social entrepreneurship. The course has five parts: 1. social entrepreneurship overview; 2. social context and stakeholders; 3. private sector roles and motivations; 4. organizational forms and collaborations; and 5. measurement and impacts. The class will enable students to pursue projects on a question in Houston and beyond the hedges of Rice.

 

 Go Experiential.
Have an idea? Want to bring your product to market? Need advice and mentorship? Ready to launch your startup? Work on your idea and get access to guidance and mentorship from Rice’s entrepreneurship network. We help you launch your company!  Apply here by December 1st, 2016.

Wondering what it’s like to work with a startup?  Want to learn a new approach towards solving problems?  Form teams and collaborate on a project contributed by a startup company. Take a design thinking, human-centered approach towards crafting a solution by developing empathy for users, articulating a problem, brainstorming possibilities, prototyping for communication, and testing and iterating.

Graduate

Getting Started? Explore the Basics.
This course equips students with frameworks and tools for establishing, growing, and modeling their business.
The course teaches how to translate a startup business plan into a bottoms up quantitative model of the business and its underlying assumptions. Students will learn how to build a model of cash flows for a startup, how to use that model to track performance and identify errors in the underlying assumptions and adjust, and how to update the model based on realized performance.
This course covers entrepreneurial strategy (1st half) and options for financing of startups (2nd half).
Strategy: The course provides an integrated strategy framework for entrepreneurs. The course is structured to provide a deep understanding of the core strategic challenges facing start-up innovators, and a synthetic framework for choosing and implementing entrepreneurial strategy in dynamic environments.A central theme of the course is that, to achieve competitive advantage, technology entrepreneurs must balance the process of experimentation and learning inherent to entrepreneurship with the selection and implementation of a strategy that establishes competitive advantage. The course identifies the types of choices that entrepreneurs must make to take advantage of a novel opportunity and the logic of particular strategic commitments and positions that allow entrepreneurs to establish competitive advantage.Financing: The course provides an overview of financing options for startups. The course covers crowdfunding, angel investors, accelerators, and the venture capital industry; the organization and operation of venture capital funds; investment methodology; monitoring and portfolio liquidation.

Take it to the Next Level.
The goal of this course is to provide the student with exposure to early stage technology entrepreneurship. Evaluation of opportunities, business model, capitalization, and early operations are covered. The focus is on the parts of entrepreneurship that are unique to dealing with the commercialization of research discoveries. A significant amount of time will be spent on university to business transitions and in thinking about how to take research discoveries and create a business.
The roles of physicians, scientists, engineers, and MBAs in biotech, medical device, and other life science companies will be described and characterized. The major trends and innovations driving the creation of new products in large established companies and venture-capital-backed startup companies are discussed. This pragmatic, experienced-based course describes the venture capital process, formation, and capitalization of high-tech companies, sources of technologies, role of tech transfer at universities and medical schools, startup operational issues, role of VCs and board members, execution time frames, liquidity process, IPOs and mergers, and payout prospects for founders and investors. Live, ongoing case studies are presented by guest entrepreneurs. These case studies of ongoing biotech, medical device, and healthcare informatics companies are presented by many notable M.D. and Ph.D. founders and CEOs. Rules of professional and ethical conduct of M.D.s, Ph.D.s, scientific advisory boards, clinical advisory boards, and boards of directors are reviewed. In the final classes, a high-tech, career-planning guide is discussed, plus a special lecture on leadership, intelligence, and entrepreneurship will be presented. Insider secrets and success stories from decades of highly successful VC practice in medical, biotech and infotech companies will be shared. Cross-list: BIOE 633.
Student Trek to Silicon Valley.  You can find more information here.

MBA

Getting Started? Explore the Basics.
Evaluating opportunities and developing a business concept; analyzing new ventures; pricing, selling, and cost control; attracting stakeholders and bootstrap finance; the legal form of business and taxation; financing, deal structure and venture capital; harvesting value; developing a business plan.
Provides an insider’s perspective on workings and challenges of an early to mid-stage pharmaceutical company. Current company issues and case studies are used to discuss topics including pre-clinical & clinical development, licensing & business development and intellectual property and patent strategies. Intended for students considering a career in an entrepreneurial biotechnology company. Previous coursework in entrepreneurship or healthcare is preferred.

Take it to the Next Level.
Overview of financing options for startups. The course covers crowdfunding, angel investors, accelerators, and the venture capital industry; the organization and operation of venture capital funds; investment methodology; monitoring and portfolio liquidation.
The needs approach to buying and selling businesses; enterprise valuation; deal and contract structuring; mergers and acquisitions; leveraged buyouts; consolidating fragmented industries.
The roles of physicians, scientists, engineers, and MBA’s in biotech, medical device, and other life science companies will be described and characterized. The major trends and innovations driving the creation of new products in large established companies and venture-capital-backed startup companies are discussed. This pragmatic, experienced-based course describes the venture capital process, formation, and capitalization of high-tech companies, sources of technologies, role of tech transfer at universities and medical schools, startup operational issues, role of VCs and board members, execution time frames, liquidity process, IPOs and mergers, and payout prospects for founders and investors. Live, ongoing case studies are presented by guest entrepreneurs. These case studies of ongoing biotech, medical device, and healthcare informatics companies are presented by many notable M.D. and Ph.D. founders and CEOs. Rules of professional and ethical conduct of M.D.s, Ph.D.s, scientific advisory boards, clinical advisory boards, and boards of directors are reviewed. In the final classes, a high-tech, career-planning guide is discussed, plus a special lecture on leadership, intelligence, and entrepreneurship will be presented. Insider secrets and success stories from decades of highly successful VC practice in medical, biotech and infotech companies will be shared. Cross-list: BIOE 633.
his course provides an integrated strategy framework for entrepreneurs. The course is structured to provide a deep understanding of the core strategic challenges facing start-up innovators, and a synthetic framework for choosing and implementing entrepreneurial strategy in dynamic environments. A central theme of the course is that, to achieve competitive advantage, technology entrepreneurs must balance the process of experimentation and learning inherent to entrepreneurship with the selection and implementation of a strategy that establishes competitive advantage. The course identifies the types of choices that entrepreneurs must make to take advantage of a novel opportunity and the logic of particular strategic commitments and positions that allow entrepreneurs to establish competitive advantage.
What might constitute social responsibility in a market setting? If social responsibility connotes a connection between a person and a social problem say between you and a poor person in Bangladesh or Houston how might it be exercised in a market transaction of buying or selling? Is there a role of private enterprise or of private consumption for alleviating some of the social problems (e.g., health, education, pollution, poverty, etc.) that we observe and experience in communities across the world? Social Enterprise explores these and related questions in the context of business.
Millennials are no longer satisfied with pursuing a career that allows them just to make money. They are driven as well to make a difference in the lives of others, and live a richer life themselves. This practical course will study social entrepreneurship and its ability to create social change by applying business principles and earned income strategies; it will explore the elements needed to start and grow a social enterprise, using as a real-life example the organization founded and led by the lecturer; and it will allow students to explore areas they feel passionate about and utilize the knowledge gained through their MBA to draft a business plan for a plausible social enterprise. Guest speakers for this course include nationally-renowned major philanthropists, who will share their view of what it takes to be a successful social entrepreneur.
This course examines: theory and logic of alliances in value creation, alliance evolution in various industries, the spectrum of alliance types from a low level of interdependence to a high. The course is discussion-based, focusing on reading material, case studies and problem sets.
This course focuses on the legal dimensions of entrepreneurship and is designed to help students develop the managerial capability to work effectively with legal counsel to solve complex problems and to protect and leverage firm resources. Like information technology, the legal dimensions of business should not be treated as an after-thought or add-on to the business strategy development process. Corporate leaders with an understanding of American law have a unique capacity to protect and enhance shareholder wealth. Conversely, managers who lack the ability to integrate law into the development of strategy can place the firm at a competitive disadvantage and imperil its economic viability. The overarching purpose of Legal Aspects of Entrepreneurship is to prepare students to meet the legal and regulatory challenges and opportunities they can expect to encounter as entrepreneurs, venture capitalists, and managers of private and public businesses. The course provides a conceptual framework for understanding both the societal context within which businesses are organized and operate, as well as the various legal tools available to managers engaged in evaluating and pursuing opportunities. Legal Aspects of Entrepreneurship will offer strategies and tactics for working with counsel to use the law as a positive force to increase realizable value while managing the attendant risks and keeping the legal costs under control. The objective is not to teach business students how to think like lawyers, but rather to teach students how to become more legally astute so they can handle with confidence the legal aspects of entrepreneurship and management. This includes developing legal literacy and learning what to look for when selecting an attorney and knowing when to call one.
The goal of this course is to provide the student with exposure to early stage technology entrepreneurship. Evaluation of opportunities, business model, capitalization, and early operations are covered. The focus is on the parts of entrepreneurship that are unique to dealing with the commercialization of research discoveries. A significant amount of time will be spent on university to business transitions and in thinking about how to take research discoveries and create a business.
Student Trek to Silicon Valley.  You can find more information here.

Go experiential.

Put your entrepreneurial skills and tools to work in one of our many Entrepreneurship Experiential Learning Labs. See our Entrepreneurship Lab page for more details!

Click here to learn more

EMBA

Getting Started? Explore the Basics.
Evaluating opportunities and developing a business concept; analyzing new ventures; pricing, selling, and cost control; attracting stakeholders and bootstrap finance; the legal form of business and taxation; financing, deal structure and venture capital; harvesting value; developing a business plan.

Take it to the next Level.
Overview of the venture capital industry; the organization and operation of venture capital funds; investment methodology; monitoring and portfolio liquidation; leveraged investing; and specialized investments.
Study of the nature of creativity, creative thinking skills and ways to encourage, promote, and effectively manage creativity and innovation in complex organizations.
The needs approach to buying and selling businesses; enterprise valuation; deal and contract structuring; mergers and acquisitions; leveraged buyouts; consolidating fragmented industries.

 

Entrepreneurship@Rice is a collaborative effort of students, professors, mentors and the Houston entrepreneur community.
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Rice University